Posted in Knitting

Free Sock Knitting Pattern: Cable Rib Socks

Cable Rib free sock knitting pattern
Terrible picture of cute socks!

Years ago, when I worked at Interweave, I designed the free sock knitting pattern, Cable Rib Socks. It appeared in a free eBook called Knitting Patterns for Knitting Accessories. A new version of this eBook is on the site now, and the sock pattern isn’t in it. Since people have asked me for the pattern, so I decided to put it on The Craftermath.

Download the free pattern here: Cable Rib Socks.

Sorry for the HORRIBLE PHOTOS. Funny story, I only knit one of these, and through the magic of Photoshop, two appeared in the eBook. Yeah, fake news. I’m going to knit these again so I can have a better photo, and a complete pair of socks.

The original pattern was knit from Zauberball Crazy, which I love, but I really think the stitch pattern would shine with a solid yarn. I’ll have to search my stash and see what I have. Probably nothing—yay, time to shop!

Cable Rib free sock knitting pattern
Cable Rib Socks from Ravelry user CazzaKnitter. Her yarn choice is perfect; it really shows off the stitch pattern.

I’m not the most prolific sock knitter, and truthfully, I don’t really enjoy knitting socks. I tend to have a death grip on those tiny needles, and my hands aren’t happy. Maybe I should try knitting on bamboo needles. Do any of you sock knitters have advice on this?

I’m heading to Phoenix in a couple of weeks, and this will be my travel project. Here’s hoping I can finish them up!

Cheers,

1KCsigCable Rib Socks

P.S. Let me know if you have any sock-knitting advice for me. I could use it!

 

Advertisements
Posted in Knitting

Faux Isle with the Flurries Hat

My newest free hat knitting pattern is available today on Countryside Network! It’s called the Flurries Hat because it features a snowflake motif.

I used my favorite faux isle technique, which is stranded knitting with a solid main color and a variegated or self-striping contrasting color. Here’s the motif on Flurries:

Flurries free hat knitting pattern

I got this stitch pattern from the Harmony Guides: Colorwork Stitches, and incorporated it into an easy beanie pattern.

As soon as this hat was done, Mimi put it on and she’s worn it almost every day this winter! So cute on her, right?

flurries free hat knitting pattern

Her hair is perfect for it, too.

I had so much fun writing this pattern; the first part of the joy was choosing the yarn. I looked through all of the yarns at Alpaca Direct, finally settling on Berroco Vintage. I love knitting with Vintage—it comes in a wonderful array of colors, it’s washable, and it’s super-economical.

I chose charcoal for my main color and purple haze for my contrasting color. The purples and blues make nice color changes for the snowflake motif.

The great thing about knitting stranded colorwork with variegated yarn is that the yarn does the work for you. The snowflake section of Flurries is so colorful and wintry, and it’s all done with just two yarns, the main and contrasting colors! You’re welcome.

Several years ago, I designed my Faux Isle Hat for Interweave (also a free pattern!).

free hat knitting pattern
Left: My original Faux Isle Hat; Mimi’s red version

I loved the technique so much, and I wanted to use it again—so here you go!

The pattern includes an adult version (20″ circumference) and a toddler version. Make matchies for you and your little one.

Hope you like it!

Cheers,

1KCsig

 

Posted in Knitting

I hate Veronika

I spent about three months on and off knitting my Veronika Cardigan, all the while picturing myself wearing it everywhere and being cozy, warm, and stylish.

When I was finished, I tried it on, all excited about my life-changing finished object, and nope, nope, nope! It was absolutely hideous on me. HIDEOUS! No one believed me, and when I tried it on for my knitting group at our holiday party, one of my favorite people said, “Yeah, it’s not good.” I love her.

So I gave it to my friend Edie, who’s also in my knitting group. She is taller and slimmer than I am, and it looked great on her. She hesitated to accept it, until I told her that I wanted it out of the house, and if she didn’t take it, I’d give it to someone else. She put it on and didn’t take it off.

Edie in Veronika
Beautiful Edie in her brand new sweater! 🙂

Now I don’t want you all to think I’m trashing the pattern, because I’m definitely not. It’s just terrible for my body. Because this was a knit-along, I’ve seen it on several people, and it looked great on them all. I do have to say, however, that it looks best on people who are taller, like 5′ 6″ or more. Although now that I think about it, my friend Terry is about my height, and her’s looks great. So . . . maybe it’s not for chubettes. Or just my brand of chubette, because it looks fine on the Ravelry folks.

Anyway, lesson learned: don’t go for oversized, boxy items!

Honestly, though, I was pretty upset. I had spent so much time knitting this beast, and I loved my yarn choice. I felt bad about my body, and I had a thought that I’d just knit accessories from now on, because sweaters in my size take FOREVER, and it’s such a crap-shoot on fit. At least for me it is.

But then I had a stern conversation with myself, and thought about the successful knits I’ve made, including another cardigan I just finished; blog to come after I take some decent pictures.

pile of Veronika
A pile of Veronika

This Veronika process also helped me realize that I need to make better choices (in many things, but I’m talking about knitting here). Why on earth would I think an over-sized sweater would look good on me? I am already over-sized, and I need to flatter my shape, not expand it! Total fail on the pattern choice. I just loved the look of it on the model and in The Studio, where I saw a finished sample and joined the KAL. So, again, lesson learned.

My next sweater will be a well-thought-out project, with much consideration of how the sweater will look on me, not how it looks on other people, especially the model. Kris from The Studio is a master of fitting knits, so I’m going to be asking her for advice.

Leave a comment and give me your advice,and tell me about your fails. I need some company here!

Cheers,

1KCsig

Posted in Knitting

SeraCraft: An Indie Dyer and a Family Affair

Hand-dyed yarns always draw me in. There’s something so magical about them; the hard work and creativity of the dyer just shines through in each skein. I’m so lucky to be friends with one of the best indie dyers out there, Sarah from SeraCraft yarn. She and her family live on their 10-acre farm north of Spokane, Washington, and she’s in one of my knitting groups.

indie-dyer SeraCraft
From left: Sugar Rush, Rusted Twisty, Check Out My Watermelons

I love following Sarah on social media and seeing her gorgeous colorways pop up in my Facebook and Instagram feeds. Just stunningly beautiful yarn!

indie dyer SeraCraft
Shark Week

The really neat thing about SeraCraft yarn is that Sarah’s kids help her dye and name the yarn. One of my recent favorites was called Shark Week, name courtesy of Sarah’s son, and the colors were cool blues and grays. It’s all sold out, but Sarah does dye to order!

Sarah has a degree in fashion design and merchandising, and she studied art in London and at the Academy of Art in San Francisco, and you can see that expertise in her yarn. She puts colors together unexpectedly and beautifully, and her kids obviously inherited that artistic spirit, too.

Sarah started knitting in 2004, after seeing celebrities knitting, and remembering her grandmother knitting and cross-stitching. Because she lived in Florida when she started knitting, there weren’t a ton of knit shops around, so she got a copy of Stitch ‘n Bitch and taught herself. Sarah’s first project was a wonky scarf (sound familiar?), but she’d been bit by the knitting bug, and she never looked back!

indie dyer SeraCraft
Sarah’s handknit socks for her daughter, Amelia. She used her Big Heart colorway with contrasting heels and toes from Hedgehog Fibers Genie.

When she moved to the Inland Northwest and discovered local yarn shops, she was introduced to beautiful yarn and talented teachers, and she really stretched her skills. Now Sarah test-knits for designers, as well as making gorgeous knitwear for her family and herself. And she’s one of the most prolific sock knitters I’ve ever met.

Sarah came across indie dyers in yarn shops, and saw their videos on YouTube. She was inspired and decided to give it a try. She got a book on the subject, ordered some plain yarn, and started in! After going through a box of 20 skeins of yarn in a weekend, she ordered some mini-skeins so she could try even more dying combinations, and a cottage industry was born.

grab bag mini-skein
Grab bag mini-skein. Gorgeous grays!

Her favorite yarn bases are wool and wool-nylon blends, because they work well for her favorite projects, sweaters, shawls, and socks. Currently, the SeraCraft Etsy shop is stocked with fingering- and worsted-weight options. Sarah is considering a cashmere blend in worsted- and DK-weights, and bringing in a bulky base yarn for those quick-knits. Yes please!

Drawn to colors from nature, Sarah also enjoys mixing in the occasional bright or neon. Her kids have given her ideas, such as a collection based on fish, and her seven-year-old son, Liam, suggests colors and sketches ideas for her. He names seventy-five percent of her colorways! I just love that.

Amelia, Sarah’s darling daughter, is also interested in yarn, and she thinks there should be much more pink in the world. I agree!

indie dyer SeraCraft
Liam and Amelia with some of their favorite colorways. Cutie-pies!

Sarah’s business is run out of her kitchen, but her husband plans to build her a studio in a garage on their property. I predict she’s going to need that extra room sooner than later—her business is bound to take off.

indie dyer SeraCraft
Aliens on the Moon

Sarah and her family truly live a handmade life. They raise chickens and ducks, have a big vegetable garden that provides canned goods all year, and they make soap every year, just to mention a few of her homesteading activities. They’re thinking about getting some pygmy goats, and I am first in line to hug them!

Sarah’s philosophy for SeraCraft is bringing joy to people through her yarn. Whether they admire it for a while in their stashes or cast on a project right away, Sarah’s goal is for all of her customers to be happy with their purchases. And judging from the reviews on SeraCraft, she’s achieving her goal!

I hope you’ll check out SeraCraft and support my friend’s small business. She’s offering 15% off through March 2018 (enter the code CRAFTERMATH) to all of my readers, so go crazy!

Cheers,

1KCsig

P.S. Who are your favorite indie dyers?