Posted in Knitting

I LOVE Zuni!

I promised a blog post on my successful finished object, so here it is: The Zuni Cardigan!

Zuni Cardigan Knitting Pattern
A successful project! The Zuni Cardigan all done. The left side looks a little longer because I’m leaning to the left. The sides are the same length.

This beauty was technically finished last November, but the sleeve caps were giving me fits. I changed the pattern because of my crazy-short arms, and when I looked at the photos on the pattern, I though there were a couple of gathers at the top of the sleeve. I knit the sleeve caps with lots of stitches across the top so I could fold it into gathers, and it looked ridiculous.

So I did just one gather, and I liked that better. Looking more closely at the pattern, though, it didn’t call for gathers at all. But I was done, and mine has a gather! It’s cute, I think, although I really don’t need the extra bulk. But like I said, it’s done!

Mods I Made

  • Since I changed the sleeve length, and I got lazy, so I only did one colorwork section on the sleeves. What do you think?
  • Another modification I made was omitting the belt. I don’t look good in belted garments, so this is just an open front cardi. I can close it with a shawl pin, or add a snap later if I want to.
  • I made the back and fronts longer by adding a few rows to the cream sections between the colorwork rows.

In an earlier blog post, I detailed the progress of this project, so check that out for more info.

Yarn Love

zuniyarndetailI used Universal Yarns Deluxe Worsted in Gold Spice, Charcoal Heather, and Oatmeal Heather, as shown at right. This yarn was great to work with, and it’s super economical. Love that!

I loved these colors when I saw them in the original pattern, so I decided not to mess with a good thing. Jesie Ostermiller knows of what she speaks.

I’m really happy with this sweater, and I’ve worn it a lot. The length is perfect, and although I thought I’d want a closure in the front, I enjoy wearing it open. It’s a warm sweater, so wearing it open helps with that.

I hope you’ll give this one a try.

Cheers,

1KCsig

 

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Posted in Knitting

The Veronika Cardigan and 10 Ways to Use Markers

veronika cardigan knitting pattern
The Veronika Cardigan by Shannon Cook

I’m currently working on Shannon Cook’s brilliant Veronika Cardigan knitting pattern. Seriously cool, people.

It’s knit in a giant T, and then certain sections are sewn together to make armholes. It’s a wrap that’s sorta ponchoesque, but open in front so it’s a cardi. Yeah. It’s its own, beautiful beast.

This pattern is all me. I love loose, long, cozy toppers, and my go-tos are getting a bit ragged. Before I knew about this pattern, I had just told Mimi that I needed a new wrap wardrobe!

That’s just one of the reasons I’m excited about knitting this cardigan. Here are a few more:

  • It’s something I know I’ll wear a ton.
  • I’m using yarn from my stash—Tahki Donegal Tweed in a gorgeous dark green.
  • The construction is unique and the design is clever.
  • It’s part of a knit-along at my friend Kris’s shop, Knit Knit: The Studio, and the group is full of my friends!

Here’s my progress so far:

veronika cardigan knitting pattern
Veronika Cardigan: Making progress!

I can hear you all saying, “Cool, but what the hell are all of those markers for?” Well, the yarn is dark, and I couldn’t see my increases, so I placed a marker after each increase. I needed to have 15 total decreases, and counting the markers is WAY easier than finding and counting the decreases. Markers are magic, and I love them—so much so that I wrote a top-10 blog for Alpaca Direct, all about markers. Check it out, and add your favorite use!

But back to Veronika—what you see above is actually the front. Veronika has a shawl collar, and deep ribbing all around the bottom. The longer rows at left are the start of the back. When the back is completed, the ribbing picked up and knit at the bottom. To complete the cardigan, the back ribbing is sewn to the front ribbing, and voila! Here’s the schematic, which will help this make sense:

veronika cardigan knitting pattern
Veronika schematic: The ribbing is attached at points A and G, on both sides, to make the armholes.

Pretty slick, right? I think so.

This is a lot of knitting, but the textured rib stitch gives it some interest, and with worsted-weight yarn, it’s knitting up relatively quickly.

If you’re looking for a cardi to wear all winter, Veronika is your project. I recommend it, along with a new bunch of markers!

Cheers,

 

P.S. What’s your favorite way to use markers? Leave a comment and share it with me!

 

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Posted in Knitting

Knitting Techniques: Corrugated Ribbing (with knitting videos!)

galvanized1So … I’ve been working on Amy Christoffers’ Galvanized Cardigan for over a year, and I’m beating myself up about it, because I’m knitting it as a gift, and I wanted to get it done sooner. #knittingguilt

I’m knitting this one for our family doctor; here’s the story. Several years ago, Mimi knitted this cardigan for a Project Diary on Knitting Daily (link at end of post), and it turned out not to fit her as well as she hoped, so she gave it to my mom, who wears it ALL THE TIME. In fact, she’s wearing it right now. No joke.

Anyway, Mom wore it to a doctor’s appointment, and our doc fell in love with it. She asked my mom where she got it, and when she heard that Mimi knit it, she asked if she could pay one of us to make it for her, in exactly the same yarn. My mom said she’d ask us, but we didn’t usually knit for other people.

When she asked me about it, though, I said I would love to knit it for Dr. Awesome (not her real name, ha ha). After everything she’s done for our family, it’s the least I can do. And Dr. A is the size a of a pea, so I thought I could get it done quickly. But, as you know, I didn’t.

I’m back to it now, though, and I will finish it in time for her to wear it before the weather warms up. #knittinggoals

This sweater is started from the bottom up and knit to the underarms. Then the sleeves are knit and attached to the body, and the yoke is knitted to finish up the body. The sweater is completed by knitting the neckband and buttonband. I’ve got the body and one sleeve done, and I’ve cast on the other sleeve.

galvanizedcardi-in-progress
The Galvanized Cardigan in progress. If you look closely, you can see a mistake on the sleeve ribbing. I talk more about that in the video below below: it’s fixable!

The most challenging part of this sweater is the corrugated ribbing (I’ll bet you were wondering when I was going to get to that!). I filmed a video about knitting this technique in the round, and I’m working on one for knitting it flat. The flat corrugated ribbing is actually more challenging, and much less common, than working this technique in the round. Since corrugated ribbing is used all the time in colorwork on hems, cuffs, and hats, it’s usually knit in the round, as those things lend themselves to that method. And colorwork sweaters are usually steeked, so you can still knit the ribbing in the round.

Regardless of how you knit this ribbing, the trick is twisting the yarn not in use as you knit so you don’t have a hole between each color. It’s the same method that’s used in intarsia knitting; you pick up the new color from under the old color, which naturally twists the two colors in the process.

Amy’s directions for corrugated ribbing say, “When working corrugated rib, always strand the yarn not in use across the wrong side of the fabric , as for stranded colorwork. This will require passing the yarns front and back for the purl and knit stitches and simultaneously stranding the unused color.” Okaaaaaay …. I had to work hard to wrap my brain around this until I got the yarn in my hands.

This is k1, p1 knitting with two colors, but you have to work if as if you’re using one color, so the purling yarn has to be moved to the back after each purl stitch and the new yarn must be brought under the old yarn each time you knit, which secures the yarn. It’s a lot of bringing yarn back and forth, but once you get into the rhythm, it’s no big deal.

When knitting in the round, I found that holding the purl yarn in my left hand helped me automatically trap the yarn. Here’s how I did that, plus another cool tip about this knitting technique.

So that’s pretty easy. But for this pattern, you also have to knit corrugated ribbing flat, which is a bit more challenging. You have to take the purl yarn to the back when you’re working on the right side, and the knit yarn to the front when you’re working on the wrong side. WHAAAAAT?? I know. Here’s a video that might help:

I can’t wait to get the Galvanized Cardigan finished and deliver it to Dr. Awesome!

Cheers,

1KCsig

Links and Stuff

Galvanized Cardigan Project Diary

Galvanized Cardigan knitting pattern from the Interweave Store

Posted in Knitting

My Zuni Cardigan Knitting Adventure

I’ve been working on my Zuni Cardigan (get the pattern) on and off (mostly off) for almost two years. I vowed to finish it this winter, and I’m well on my way. Here’s what I’ve knit  so far:

I'm on my way with the Zuni Cardigan knitting pattern! Back done and almost one front, too.

That’s the back in its entirety and one almost complete front.

I made a few moderations, of course. I added more length by knitting four extra rows in each section between colorwork stripes, and I went up a needle size on the fronts.

I’m a tight colorwork knitter, so I wanted to go up a needle size (from 4s to 5s) for the stranded stripes on the fronts and sleeves anyway, but I decided that maybe the whole thing could be a little looser, which give me a tiny bit of extra length in the front.

The Zuni Cardigan knitting pattern. The right piece is knitted on 5s and the left on 4s.

Here’s a closeup of what the back and front side-by-side. I think that gauges are close enough, and since I’m doing the same number of rows, I’ll be able to match everything up perfectly.

Normally, I add short-rows in the front of sweaters to make room for the boobs and belly, but I couldn’t do that with this sweater because it would look . . . weird. I’d end up with larger stripes of cream in the front, and I don’t think I’d like that. So hopefully, the larger needles will help. But since I added length throughout, I’m not too worried. And this is meant to be an outer layer, after all.

Yarn used in my Zuni Cardigan knitting patternI’m using Universal Yarns Deluxe Worsted in Gold Spice, Charcoal Heather, and Oatmeal Heather, as shown at right.

I rarely use the yarn colors shown in the sample sweater, but this time I just had to! Jesie Ostermiller’s color choices are so right on. I looked and looked at other combos, finally deciding not to reinvent the wheel. These three colors just work.

What’s funny is that I’ve gotten so many compliments on the color combination, with people complimenting me on my ability to choose colors that contrast so well. I can’t take the credit, but I can enjoy the fact that people like the sweater I’m knitting!

I’m working on a bobble row right now, and I know from questions I’ve gotten on Knitting Daily, many people don’t like bobbles! But as it turns out, this is because they don’t know how to knit them. So here’s a quick video showing how these tiny little bobbles are worked.

I hope this helps you, bobble-makers!

Cheers,

1KCsig

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